Let's chew the fat

Most of us have had it drummed into us that fat is bad and we should only be eating food low in fat to prevent heart disease, obesity, diabetes and a host of other preventative diseases. However, does the evidence reflect the guidelines we have grown up on? To look at this properly, we need to go back in time and look at the story of saturated fat.

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Paul TaylorComment
Move to activate your genes

For very good reasons, the health and fitness communities focus on exercise – we know that exercise is a very powerful driver of gene expression and the famous American researcher and cardiologist Frank Booth once said, ‘We know of no single intervention with greater promise than physical exercise to reduce the risk of virtually all chronic diseases simultaneously’.

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Paul TaylorComment
Discover your health drivers

Many individuals talk about their genes when it comes to their health, and there is an explosion in genetic research and DNA testing, with a trend towards people mapping their entire genome to better understand their health risks. When you look at both ends of the health spectrum – chronic disease and health longevity, although genetics play a role, the drivers take place at the level of cells and messenger molecules

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Paul TaylorComment
Hormesis and optimum health

Exposing the body to training stresses, such as sprinting or lifting heavy weights, induces changes in gene expression which result in a an adaptive response – and the body ultimately becoming bigger, faster, stronger. This knowledge led to me reframing potential stress in my life as something that would make me stronger.

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Paul TaylorComment
The 3 keys to successful lifestyle change

The Body-Brain Performance Institute recently completed a 12-week lifestyle intervention with 23 obese employees of Woolworths and the results were truly outstanding. Nineteen of the twenty three participants met the criteria for Metabolic Syndrome at the start of the study, a condition which increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease by 200 to 300 per cent.

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Paul TaylorComment